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Every Problem Has A Solution Essay Outline

Writing a Problem-Solution Essay: Drafting the Essay

If youve done a thorough job researching and planning, writing a problem-solution essay isn't difficult. Open the Problem-Solution Essay diagram that you created in Webspiration Classroom™ to help you draft your essay.

 

Introduction: The ProblemThe opening paragraph needs to:
  1. Capture the reader's attention. Asking a question or quoting a fact can be an effective way to capture attention and introduce the problem.
  2. Define the problem and explain why it’s significant. Why does it matter? Why is it a problem?
  3. State your thesis.
Body: Possible SolutionsThe body should:
  • Contain at least two paragraphs that outline possible solutions and your critique of them (why you think they won't work as well as the best solution)
  • Present your preferred solution last, and support it with evidence documenting why it’s the best
  • Propose how you would implement your solution
Conclusion: Call to ActionThe conclusion should briefly recap the problem and proposed solution. It should end with a strong call to action—possibly telling the reader what will happen if your solution isn't implemented.

 

Using Transitions
Transitional words and phrases are like glue—they hold your essay together. Use them each time you start a new paragraph or between thoughts within a paragraph. Here are a few transition words and phrases to get you started:

  • Therefore,
  • As a result,
  • Nonetheless
  • Consequently,
  • For this reason,
  • In addition,
  • In conclusion,

 

Drafting in Webspiration Classroom™
Use Outline View in Webspiration Classroom to draft your essay. You can type your paragraphs directly into the outline as if you were working in a word processing program. This will allow you to get feedback from your peers and teacher using the Collaboration Tools.

Check out these related Study Tips:

 

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Start by thinking about things that bother you or problems that you find irritating. If you've thought, "I know how this could be done better!" you have a great idea for your paper.

Step One: Think about groups that you belong to and problems that those groups have. Make a list of groups you belong to like:

  • School
  • Hometown community
  • Clubs
  • Sports teams
  • Hobby groups
  • People groups (teenagers, high school students, college students, family, males, females, race, culture, or language group)

Step Two: Make a list of problems you have encountered in some of these groups. Sometimes, there is a plan for a solution but it isn't working, or maybe the plan isn't being enforced. The problem doesn't have to be a big one, but it has to be something you can convince other people needs to be and can be solved, or at least made better.

Step Three: Once you have your topic, you might want to go through the exercises in my problem solution guide to get ready to write.