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Gordon Willey Bibliography

1973), The Origins of the Maya Civilization (Adams, 1979), and Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns (Ashmore, 1991). Willey wrote and coauthored the summary statement for all of these and also wrote the introductory chapter for the School of American Research volume on Late Maya Civilization (Sabloff and Andrews, 1986).

Willey served as the president of the American Anthropological Association in 1960-62 and of the Society of American Archaeology in 1967-68. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (elected 1952), the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, the Society of Antiquaries, a member of the Sociedad Mexicana de Antropologia, the National Academy of Sciences (elected 1960), the American Philosophical Society (elected in 1984), and a corresponding member of the British Academy.

When he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he was told by Professor Tozzer, who nominated him, “I got you into the American Academy, but there are two higher ranking academies in the United States, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and it’s up to you to get yourself into those academies.”

Willey’s awards included the A. V. Kidder Medal for Archaeology, the Order of the Quetzal from the government of Guatemala, the Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement from the Archaeological Institute of America, the Viking Fund Medal for Archaeology, the Huxley Medal from the Royal Anthropological Institute, the Distinguished Service Award from the Society for American Archaeology, the Walker Prize from the Boston Museum of Science, the Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal for Archaeology from the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania, and the Gold Medal from the London Society of Antiquaries. He was awarded honorary doctorates from the Uni-

Willey, along with Robert McC. Adams, is often credited with placing settlement patterns and household organization at the forefront of archaeological investigation. His emphasis on reconstructing regional culture histories made him the target of criticism by the New Archaeology (see also the Oxford Bibliographies article Processual Archaeology), whose advocates concurrently embraced his contributions to archaeological method and practice. Sabloff 1994 elaborates on the revolutionary influence Willey’s settlement pattern approach had on the practice of Maya archaeology. Four years prior to his retirement, Willey was honored in Leventhal and Kolata 1983 and Vogt and Leventhal 1983, a massive two-volume collection of innovative research by former students, many of whom became prominent scholars themselves. Sabloff and Fash 2007 is a posthumous collection of papers that assess Willey’s broad contributions to Americanist and anthropological archaeology. Fash 2007 and Sabloff 2007 introduce and conclude Sabloff and Fash 2007, highlighting the impact of Willey’s empirical, methodological, and theoretical impact on the study of New World prehistory. Prior to his death in 2002, Willey published two collections of his writings. Willey 1987 exclusively centers on overviews of Maya archaeology. Willey 1990 is a comprehensive collection of Willey’s publications and includes his later reflections on the relevancy of each publication in light of subsequent research on each topic.

  • Fash, William L. 2007. Introduction. In Gordon R. Willey and American archaeology: Contemporary perspectives. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and William L. Fash, 3–14. Norman: Univ. of Oklahoma Press.

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    This introduction places ten specific publications, whose topics/themes are the subject of each chapter in the book, within the historical context of Willey’s career.

  • Leventhal, Richard M., and Alan L. Kolata, eds. 1983. Civilization in the ancient Americas: Essays in honor of Gordon R. Willey. Albuquerque, NM, and Cambridge, MA: Univ. of New Mexico Press, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard Univ.

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    One of two collected works jointly published in honor of Willey in 1983. All the authors are former students of Willey’s. Regional focus is nearly balanced between Mesoamerica and the Andes. Chapter topics are highly diverse and include a historical overview of Maya studies, material analysis reports, settlement analyses, urbanism, and empire. Contains a complete bibliography of Willey’s publications (1937–1982).

  • Sabloff, Jeremy A. 1994. The new archaeology and the ancient Maya. Scientific American Library 30. New York: Scientific American Library.

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    First published in 1990, this text describes the history of Maya archaeology. It cites the key role of Willey’s settlement pattern studies in altering conceptions of Maya society and demography in the 1960s. Also describes projects directed by Willey at Altar de Sacrificios, Seibal, and Copan.

  • Sabloff, Jeremy A. 2007. Conclusion. In Gordon R. Willey and American archaeology: Contemporary perspectives. Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff and William L. Fash, 233–236. Norman: Univ. of Oklahoma Press.

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    Short statement on Willey’s legacy that argues his most enduring contribution to archaeology is ultimately the data he collected, organized, and published.

  • Sabloff, Jeremy A., and William L. Fash, eds. 2007. Gordon R. Willey and American archaeology: Contemporary perspectives. Norman: Univ. of Oklahoma Press.

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    This volume recognizes Willey’s scholarly and empirical contributions to archaeological practice and culture history of the New World. Chapters evaluate the historical context and scholarly impact of ten Willey publications.

  • Vogt, Evon Z., and Richard M. Leventhal, eds. 1983. Prehistoric settlement patterns: Essays in honor of Gordon R. Willey. Cambridge, MA: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard Univ.

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    One of two collected works jointly published in honor of Willey in 1983. Authors are former students and collaborators of Willey’s. Regional focus is predominantly Mesoamerica, although comparative case studies include South America, China, and Europe. Themes in settlement archaeology include household studies, community organization, cities, regional analysis, and method and theory.

  • Willey, Gordon R. 1987. Essays in Maya archaeology. Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press.

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    A limited collection of seven previously published articles and book chapters authored (or coauthored) by Willey. Regionally exclusive to the Maya. Selections are predominantly synthetic in scope because several are overviews or conclusions to edited volumes. Foreword by Jeremy Sabloff.

  • Willey, Gordon R. 1990. New World archaeology and culture history: Collected essays and articles. Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press.

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    A comprehensive collection of thirty previously published articles. Selections are wide ranging in regional and topical breadth. Section headings include “Culture-Historical and Developmental Syntheses” (thirteen selections), “Patterns in the Data” (eight selections), “A Priori Hypotheses” (three selections), “Settlement Patterns” (three selections), “Method and Theory” (two selections), and “Recovery of Ideology” (one selection). Each section and subsection is prefaced by short introductory comments by Willey.